29 November 2005

Further analyzing the "other" 360 model

I pulled this graphic off the 360 press release. Take a good look at it.

  1. First, take a look at the the foul territory. It's definitely not like the Coliseum - much more shallow - so any comparison to the Coliseum can be dismissed.
  2. Next, the lower deck is split into two regions. Normally this would appear to be done with an aisle plus tunnels or vomitories, but that's probably not the case here. It appears that the upper portion is elevated slightly above the lower region, making the upper region a sort of mezzanine. The lower region may very well be the club seats. If this area has separate admission, it could translate into an unfriendly environment for autograph seekers.
  3. The yellow divider between the two regions? That could be the layer of minisuites that Wolff discussed in his presentation. The attractive thing about them is that they probably aren't more than 8 rows from the field. Each minisuite would also have direct access to the club concourse.
  4. Down the lines a bit, the upper portion of the mezzanine is interrupted by what look like party suites. It accomplishes two goals: it keeps the party suites separated from the luxury suite concourse, and it occupies space that would normally be occupied by seats that are difficult to sell (take a look at sections 100-104 and 130-134 during any non-sellout at the Coliseum for proof).
  5. The luxury suites are the least surprising element, since they follow the design used at PNC Park, where they were low-profile and tucked underneath the upper deck.
  6. The upper deck contains no surprises either. Tapering the bowl down towards the outfield helps create the scarcity Wolff is trying to achieve and will also limit the number of Uecker seats in the house.
  7. The bowl is symmetrical, and neither side wraps around the foul pole as it does in the Coliseum North design.
  8. The outfield isn't adorned with a hotel or overhanging suites, but that may be a perspective issue, because the view comes from beyond right field.
  9. The bullpens are now well-defined in the corners due to the breaks in the seating areas. Notice that there's no Fenway-like right field corner with the Pesky Pole.
This model answers the one obvious question that came from the Wolff presentation: Where are the suites? This "two"-deck design addresses it and then some. My guess at this point is that these are the main elements within the seating bowl, which makes sense because it's how the A's are going to make most of their money. The outfield elements are possible based on site constraints and cost factors. They're really the icing, to show what can be innovated in fair territory. Rest assured that most of the revenue will come from people in foul territory. Replace the plain grandstand in the presentation with this concept, and you may have most of the final design in place.


Georob said...

I still think we're reading too much into this unless Wolff asked 360 to come up with configurations other than what was revealed before.

Remember, these people do stadiums all the time; both big and small. They must have hundreds of concepts and templates ready to put on a PR release at a moments' notice. In this case, it would have made more sense to use the design shown to the City Council that had "Athletics" atop the scoreboard.

It's a good design, I just don't think it's ours.(Yet)

Marine Layer said...

The point is that the rendering addresses issues that Wolff brought up in the presentation but didn't have represented in the drawings he had at the podium.

There's also one little item about the graphic: on the press release itself, the caption below reads "Oakland A's Ballpark"

It probably isn't the final design since the site will dictate that. It does answer the question about where premium seating would be located.